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There ain’t no party like the Dragon Age party January 3, 2010

Posted by Santiago Azpurua-Borras in Copy+Paste Original, Games.
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Xandir and Zevran, totally NOT the same character.

While I was a little late to play Bioware’s Dragon Age: Origins, I’m incredibly happy with myself for managing to snag a copy.

While it offered a pretty cut-and-paste fantasy RPG experience, something really stood out to me: the interaction between the player’s character and his/her party. As a matter of fact, some of the conversations I had with my party were the most memorable moments of the game for me.

Hit the jump to read more.

WARNING: THIS ARTICLE CONTAINS SOME SPOILERS

As the tale of Dragon Age begins, you are chosen to join an elite organization of saviors called the Specters Grey Wardens. The Grey Wardens are tasked to stop the invasion of the Reapers Darkspawn before they destroy all organic life the beings of Ferelden.

Along the way, I encountered an interesting group of adventurers. Two that stood out were the shapeshifting-Hot-Topic-employee-reject Morrigan and the elf-butt-assassin Zevran.

Having been a big Mass Effect fan, I knew Morrigan’s “I push others away to protect myself” attitude made her ripe for a romantic side-story. As the game progressed, I began to find out more about her, ang underneath her tough exterior was a vulnerable girl who knew little-to-nothing outside of her little bubble in the Kocari Wilds.

I was able to basically buy her affection with various gifts, and two were particularly important to her:

One was an item called the Black Grimnoire, a book that belonged to her sorceress mother, Flemeth. Turns out, Flemeth likes to raise daughters until they are of age and then steal their bodies.

I, being the gentleman that I am, effectively went out and killed her mom, expecting no reward. Morrigan seemed very touched by this, as if it was the first time someone ever did something for her just out of kindness.

She then began to talk about her childhood, and how she once stole a mirror from some traveling nobles. Her mother — being the wretched shrew that she is — broke the mirror in front of her to teach her a lesson. As I completed more quests I stumbled upon such a mirror.

And to my surprise, the mirror overjoyed Morrigan. Following the +9 approval rating, she invited me to sleep with her.

And thus my fake relationship begins.

The game continued and Morrigan decided that love is for the weak and essentially broke up with me. (I literally cannot remember the last time I’ve felt this pathetic in writing).

I expressed a slight annoyance and was rather pushy about it. She didn’t really talk to me again until the end of the game, when, all of a sudden, my ending took a very big turn, presumably for the worst.

However, during this time when Morrigan was ignoring me because she didn’t like “this feeling of dependence,” I decided to get an easy achievement by sleeping with Zevran.

(Not my proudest moment.)

After we did the deed in a really awkward cutscene (that music makes things extra uncomfortable) Zevran asked, “Where do we go from here?”

Not wanting to lose a party member (also, for the recruitment achievement) I said that we should just be friends.

Obviously, Zevran was hurt by this but never expressed it. He slowed his speech a bit and said that being friends would be just fine:  an obvious lie, as his approval rating dropped drastically.

Nobody likes the “lets just be friends speech.” Not even gay elves.

Dragon Age stood out to me because of the almost human conversations between the player and his or her companions. In the end, they were just dialogue trees; but a connection, if only least a faux one, was established.

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